Squid - A Storm Story

Squid - A Storm Story

     From his dark corner, the world-jumper sipped whisky from an oversized goblet, observing a couple of odd aliens that were similar to a few he had met on Slugnar. They were at a metal table, huddled over a plate.
    "He's still wigglin'," said the little one. His snout was wet and dripping, even when he wasn’t talking. His voice was whiny and course, probably the younger of the two. "Stick yer fork in it. At'll make it stop."

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The Ternary Code | Chapter 3 Part 2 | Gregory

The Ternary Code  |  Chapter 3 Part 2  |  Gregory

     Slipping is what the bots called it. Sometimes the word death came out; maybe because that’s what the humans called it. But slipping was the term they used when a bot lost its consciousness. If the battery was not recharged or replaced before reserve power depleted, the bot would slip. That terrified Gregory. The humans believed in God. But was God a robot? Would consciousness inside a machine be the same as the consciousness inside a human?

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The Ternary Code | Chapter 2 Part 2 | Taye

The Ternary Code  |  Chapter 2 Part 2  |  Taye

     Attraction was something that the consciousness chose on its own, irrespective of the programmer’s influence. It was as if another force was at work. But Taye could not think from where it could be or from what it could come. He was not a philosopher and chose not to think that deeply. He was an architect, taking pride in his work as it related to programming, characteristics of consciousness, and physical appearance. From there, the bots were on their own. All he knew in relation to this mystery was that he saw Ayana as a gem.

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The Ternary Code | Chapter 2 Part 1 | Taye

The Ternary Code  |  Chapter 2 Part 1  | Taye

     “Well, hurry up. I wasn’t able to see when you would be home,” she said, and flicked his nipple. Ayana did that when she felt playful; it never hurt, but he did like it. He was one of the last few bots in existence who still had nipples. After humans were gone, Taye took over construction of all robots. And although he liked the nipples which the humans gave him, he saw them as useless, so he vacated that part of their design. Now, nipples are more like a badge of honor that the more experienced and seasoned robots have.

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The Ternary Code | Chapter 1 Part 2 | Taye

The Ternary Code  |  Chapter 1 Part 2  |  Taye

     Humans had a vast capacity for morality, too. They had consciousness that was more complex than the robot’s, as most of them believed. But the robots were able to harness it, and if there was one thing in common between robot and human, it was the idea that there was something deeper than consciousness and the ability to reason. It was this idea that their consciousness passed to another place after death, on its own, in a place different from their own mind.

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The Ternary Code | Chapter 1 Part 1 | Taye

The Ternary Code  |  Chapter 1 Part 1  |  Taye

     Taye wiggled the data fibers protruding from a control panel. “The last time Uniplexus went down, we were offline for four days,” he said before walking to his station and pushing buttons, furiously. “Jax might be able to figure something out when he gets here; he’s taken quite a bit of interest in this little problem.”

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The Ternary Code | Prologue Part 2 | Mercury

The Ternary Code  |  Prologue Part 2  |  Mercury

     The city had a sparseness to it that seemed unnatural, like structures had, at one time, been removed. The buildings were less aesthetic as they used to be, only as functional as needed. She tried to think of a way to describe what she saw, something meaningful; but the only thing that matched what she saw was: mechanical.

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The Ternary Code | Prologue Part 1 | Mercury

The Ternary Code  |  Prologue Part 1  |  Mercury

     Mercury’s internal display flickered to life. It went from nothing, to intermittent, then to a steady glow. She became aware of the new noises around her, the beeping, the buzz of her display coming to life, the whir of some sort of motor coming to a halt. Her first real process was accessing her hour meter; it had just reached twenty seconds. When she opened her eyes, her lens’ dialed back to nearly closed. The stabbing light from above took some adjusting.

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How I Beat Failure

How I Beat Failure

The thing that used to plague me the most was fear. I've always been this way. As I recently told a friend on the phone, I wasn't afraid of failure; I was afraid that people would think of me as a failure. There is a difference between the two. On one hand I was fearing how people view me; on the other I didn't let fear stop me. That's a crazy mix of emotions if you've ever felt it.

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